How we know there is no planet Nibiru, planet X, or any other preconceived planet coming to destroy us

How we know there is no planet Nibiru, planet X, or any other preconceived planet coming to destroy us

Needless to say, the world didn’t end on November 19th, 2017. Nor did it on October 15th, 2017 or between September 20 and 23, 2017: the two previous doomsday predictions made by Christian numerologist and planet Nibiru conspiracy theorist David Meade.

So what gives? Is the date that Nibiru will actually impact or tidally disrupt the Earth sometime in 2018? Or is it actually never?

It’s never. Never is the answer.

Let’s start with the most obvious reason.

Has anybody, in their entire life, travelled an astronomical unit?

Has anybody, in their entire life, travelled an astronomical unit?

Just how far is an astronomical unit (AU)? Such an enormous distance is not easy to comprehend. I could say, well, it’s the average distance from the Earth to the Sun. But nobody can actually travel from the Earth to the Sun to get a feel for that distance (and even a future space explorer would never travel it in a straight line). But maybe we can put this distance in terms of human experiences by asking: has anybody traveled an AU in their lifetime?

What to Expect When You’re Expecting (to attend grad school for physics and astronomy)

What to Expect When You’re Expecting (to attend grad school for physics and astronomy)

So you’re planning on attending grad school in physics and astronomy. Maybe you’re flush with confidence and belonging, maybe you’re anxious and worried you’re lacking in some manner, or maybe you’re just “whatevs” about the this whole grad school thing. Whatever your comfort, you should be prepared to experience a few of these things: